Bind dynamically updating a zone

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When I run nsupdate to test ddns updating, I get a couple levels of failure. I'm not even getting into DHCPD yet, though I have it all configured and ready to go.

I've reached the end of google in trying to identify what I'm doing wrong - does anyone see what's the problem here? ( 2015021503 ; Serial YYYYMMDD0x 604800 ; Refresh (1 week) 86400 ; Retry (1 day) 2419200 ; Expire (4 weeks) 604800 ) ; Negative Cache TTL (1 week) ; name servers IN NS ns1.office.

dhcpd updates the target zones, however, when it goes to update the reverse zone for the subnet, it is incorrectly formatting the update such that the whole IP is appended to the zone as opposed to just the last octet which would be correct for my /24 zone.

You can see this in the logfiles: Nov 23 willy named[2430]: client 127.0.0.1#42786: updating zone '8.168.192.in-addr.arpa/IN': deleting rrset at '50.8.168.192.8.168.192.in-addr.arpa' PTR Nov 23 willy named[2430]: client 127.0.0.1#42786: updating zone '8.168.192.in-addr.arpa/IN': adding an RR at '50.8.168.192.8.168.192.in-addr.arpa' PTR Nov 23 willy dhcpd: added reverse map from 50.8.168.192.8.168.192.to android_b37930cdc250e9b0.my_BUT I altered the ddns-rev-domainname entry in my subnet section to be just "" I got this idea from this post: So even though the zone statement doesn't match, somewhere between dhcpd and named they figure out what zone it goes into.

This means that if the server does not know the answer, it will just tell the client (usually some kind of resolving DNS server) that it does not know the answer and give a reference to a server that may know more.

Authoritative-only DNS servers are often a good configuration for high performance because they do not have the overhead of resolving recursive queries from clients.

To determine which records in a BIND 8 database dump were cached, look at the TTLs and the contents of the comment field.

Authoritative zone data will have the nice, round TTLs you configured, while cached records will have had their TTLs decremented by the number of seconds they've been in the cache.

For example, these records were cached from an authoritative response from the name server at . Distro: Cent OS 6.3 Bind version: 9.8.2rc1-Red Hat-9.8.2-0.10.rc1.el6_3.5 DHCP version: dhcp-4.1.1-31.0.1.P1.el6.centos.1.x86_64 I have dynamic DNS running just fine in a small environment with one exception.Now imagine that our network administrator decides for some reason or another to move the mail server to the machine 192.168.0.11.The only thing that has to be changed is the DNS server configuration file.

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